John Jay College of Criminal Justice. Assessment Plan for General Education - PDF

Please download to get full document.

View again

of 17
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Information Report
Category:

Resumes & CVs

Published:

Views: 8 | Pages: 17

Extension: PDF | Download: 0

Share
Related documents
Description
John Jay College of Criminal Justice Assessment Plan for General Education Drafted: May 19, 2015 Introduction In the summer of 2012, the General Education Assessment Committee released a comprehensive
Transcript
John Jay College of Criminal Justice Assessment Plan for General Education Drafted: May 19, 2015 Introduction In the summer of 2012, the General Education Assessment Committee released a comprehensive report on general education outcomes across the curriculum. This pilot study was designed to accomplish two purposes. First, it would tell us about student achievement in general education under the existing program, which could be used as a baseline for future assessments of the incoming, Pathways curriculum. Second, the pilot would enable us to make concrete recommendations for both general education curriculum and pedagogy and for ways to design a long-term comprehensive plan for general education assessment under the incoming general education program. The assessment plan proposed herein is grounded in the findings of the pilot study and shaped by the learning outcomes in the new general education curriculum. The pilot study assessed student learning at the capstone level in six of the seven Middle States-recommended areas of general education competence: 1) written communication, 2) oral communication, 3) scientific reasoning, 4) critical analysis and reasoning, 5) technological competence, and 6) information literacy. Quantitative reasoning was assessed through the learning outcomes in mathematic courses (College Algebra to Calculus). To get a well-rounded snapshot, we conducted three types of assessment: Indirect, based on extant data from institutional surveys, including the National Survey of Student Engagement (2010), the Faculty Survey of Student Engagement ( ), the 2011 CUNY Student Experience Survey, and the 2011 John Jay survey of graduates; quasi-direct, which drew data from capstone assessment reports from eleven majors; and direct, in which the members of the Committee applied modified Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education (VALUE) rubrics from the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) to a random sample of capstone papers from 13 majors. The VALUE rubrics were selected because they provide a reliable, national standard against which to measure our students learning. The pilot study found that John Jay students were functioning well below national norms across all six areas of competence studied. It also revealed that there appeared to be little consensus among the faculty on which general education outcomes are most important and how to set appropriate expectations for them. The report recommended that the John Jay faculty work collaboratively to develop common rubrics (perhaps based on the VALUE models) for major general education outcomes as outlined in the new general education curriculum and to create a master plan for assessing those common outcomes on a five-year rotating schedule. The current assessment plan lays out the means by which the College can achieve those goals. The New General Education Curriculum Beginning Fall 2013, a new general education plan took effect at John Jay. Its 42 credits are derived from three sets of requirements. The first 30 credits (parts one and two) are mandated across the university; the remaining 12 credits comprise the third part, the College Option. The 30-credit CUNY Pathways curriculum consists of a 12-credit Required Core (including 6 credits in English Composition, 3 in Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning, and 3 in Life and Physical Sciences), and an 18-credit Flexible Core consisting of five multi-disciplinary content areas. Students take one course in each of the five areas and a sixth from the area of their choice. 2 All courses in the Flexible Core share three common learning outcomes that address critical thinking, communication, and information literacy. In accordance with CUNY guidelines, John Jay requires an additional 12-credit College Option to round out a total of 42 credits of general education requirements. The College Option, designed by John Jay faculty, maintains key components of the general education curriculum adopted at the College prior to the Pathways mandate. These include a 6-credit Justice Core, 3 credits in Learning from the Past, and 3 credits in Communication. The Justice Core requires one course at the 100 level and one at the 300 level. The 300-level course is selected from two options, either a U.S. or globally focused course. Learning Goals of CUNY Common Core Structure (Pathways, 30 credits) Note that a more detailed mapping of the learning outcomes for Part A of the Required Core to the common outcomes of the Flexible Core is presented in Appendix A. I. Learning Goals of the Required Core (12 credits) A. English Composition: Six credits A course in this area must meet all of the following learning outcomes. A student will: 1. Read and listen critically and analytically, including identifying an argument s major assumptions and assertions and evaluating its supporting evidence. 2. Write clearly and coherently in varied, academic formats (such as formal essays, research papers, and reports) using standard English and appropriate technology to critique and improve one s own and others texts. 3. Demonstrate research skills using appropriate technology, including gathering, evaluating, and synthesizing primary and secondary sources. 4. Support a thesis with well-reasoned arguments, and communicate persuasively across a variety of contexts, purposes, audiences, and media. 5. Formulate original ideas and relate them to the ideas of others by employing the conventions of ethical attribution and citation. B. Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning: Three credits A course in this area must meet all of the following learning outcomes. A student will: 1. Interpret and draw appropriate inferences from quantitative representations, such as formulas, graphs, or tables. 2. Use algebraic, numerical, graphical, or statistical methods to draw accurate conclusions and solve mathematical problems. 3. Represent quantitative problems expressed in natural language in a suitable mathematical format. 4. Effectively communicate quantitative analysis or solutions to mathematical problems in written or oral form. 5. Evaluate solutions to problems for reasonableness using a variety of means, including informed estimation. 6. Apply mathematical methods to problems in other fields of study. 3 C. Life and Physical Sciences: Three credits A course in this area must meet all of the following learning outcomes. A student will: 1. Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a life or physical science. 2. Apply the scientific method to explore natural phenomena, including hypothesis development, observation, experimentation, measurement, data analysis, and data presentation. 3. Use the tools of a scientific discipline to carry out collaborative laboratory investigations. 4. Gather, analyze, and interpret data and present it in an effective written laboratory or fieldwork report. 5. Identify and apply research ethics and unbiased assessment in gathering and reporting scientific data. II. Learning Goals of the Flexible Core (18 credits) Six three-credit liberal arts and sciences courses, with at least one course from each of the following five areas and no more than two courses in any discipline or interdisciplinary field. All Flexible Core courses must meet the following three learning outcomes. A student will: 1. Gather, interpret, and assess information from a variety of sources and points of view. 2. Evaluate evidence and arguments critically or analytically. 3. Produce well-reasoned written or oral arguments using evidence to support conclusions. A. World Cultures and Global Issues A course in this area must meet at least three of the following additional learning outcomes. A student will: 1. Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a discipline or interdisciplinary field exploring world cultures or global issues, including, but not limited to, anthropology, communications, cultural studies, economics, ethnic studies, foreign languages (building upon previous language acquisition), geography, history, political science, sociology, and world literature. 2. Analyze culture, globalization, or global cultural diversity, and describe an event or process from more than one point of view. 3. Analyze the historical development of one or more non-u.s. societies. 4. Analyze the significance of one or more major movements that have shaped the world s societies. 5. Analyze and discuss the role that race, ethnicity, class, gender, language, sexual orientation, belief, or other forms of social differentiation play in world cultures or societies. 6. Speak, read, and write a language other than English, and use that language to respond to cultures other than one s own. 4 B. U.S. Experience in its Diversity A course in this area must meet at least three of the following additional learning outcomes. A student will: 1. Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a discipline or interdisciplinary field exploring the U.S. experience in its diversity, including, but not limited to, anthropology, communications, cultural studies, economics, history, political science, psychology, public affairs, sociology, and U.S. literature. 2. Analyze and explain one or more major themes of U.S. history from more than one informed perspective. 3. Evaluate how indigenous populations, slavery, or immigration have shaped the development of the United States. 4. Explain and evaluate the role of the United States in international relations. 5. Identify and differentiate among the legislative, judicial, and executive branches of government and analyze their influence on the development of U.S. democracy. 6. Analyze and discuss common institutions or patterns of life in contemporary U.S. society and how they influence, or are influenced by, race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, belief, or other forms of social differentiation. C. Creative Expression A course in this area must meet at least three of the following additional learning outcomes. A student will: 1. Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a discipline or interdisciplinary field exploring creative expression, including, but not limited to, arts, communications, creative writing, media arts, music, and theater. 2. Analyze how arts from diverse cultures of the past serve as a foundation for those of the present, and describe the significance of works of art in the societies that created them. 3. Articulate how meaning is created in the arts or communications and how experience is interpreted and conveyed. 4. Demonstrate knowledge of the skills involved in the creative process. 5. Use appropriate technologies to conduct research and to communicate. D. Individual and Society A course in this area must meet at least three of the following additional learning outcomes. A student will: 1. Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a discipline or interdisciplinary field exploring the relationship between the individual and society, including, but not limited to, anthropology, communications, cultural studies, history, journalism, philosophy, political science, psychology, public affairs, religion, and sociology. 2. Examine how an individual s place in society affects experiences, values, or choices. 3. Articulate and assess ethical views and their underlying premises. 4. Articulate ethical uses of data and other information resources to respond to problems and questions. 5. Identify and engage with local, national, or global trends or ideologies, and analyze their impact on individual or collective decision-making. 5 E. Scientific World A course in this area must meet at least three of the following additional learning outcomes. A student will: 1. Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a discipline or interdisciplinary field exploring the scientific world, including, but not limited to: computer science, history of science, life and physical sciences, linguistics, logic, mathematics, psychology, statistics, and technology-related studies. 2. Demonstrate how tools of science, mathematics, technology, or formal analysis can be used to analyze problems and develop solutions. 3. Articulate and evaluate the empirical evidence supporting a scientific or formal theory. 4. Articulate and evaluate the impact of technologies and scientific discoveries on the contemporary world, such as issues of personal privacy, security, or ethical responsibilities. 5. Understand the scientific principles underlying matters of policy or public concern in which science plays a role. III. Learning Goals of the College Option (12 credits) A. Justice Core 100 Level (Justice and the Individual) A course in this area must meet the following learning outcomes. A student will: 1. Describe one s own relationship to significant issues of justice. 2. Identify problems and propose solutions through evidence-based inquiry. 3. Assess the effectiveness of one s own role in collaborations with people of diverse backgrounds. 4. Demonstrate effective planning and reflection to accomplish course outcomes. 5. Engage in co-curricular activities (i.e., clubs, student activities, lectures, tutoring, academic advisement, community service) to develop academic goals and personal growth. B. Justice Core 300 Level (Struggle for Justice and Equity in U.S.) A course in this area must meet the following learning outcomes. A student will: 1. Develop an understanding of the social, political, economic, and cultural contexts of the struggles for justice in the U.S. 2. Analyze how struggles for justice have shaped U.S. society and culture. 3. Differentiate multiple perspectives on the same subject. C. Justice Core 300 Level (Justice in Global Perspective) A course in this area must meet the following learning outcomes. A student will: 1. Develop an understanding of the social, political, economic, and cultural contexts of the struggles for justice throughout the world. 2. Analyze how struggles for justice have shaped societies and cultures throughout the world. 3. Differentiate multiple perspectives on the same subject. 6 Reporting D. Learning from the Past A course in this area must meet the following learning outcomes. A student will: 1. Demonstrate knowledge of formative events, ideas, or works in the arts, humanities, mathematics, natural sciences or social sciences. 2. Analyze the significance of major developments in U.S. and World History. 3. Differentiate multiple perspectives on the same subject. E. Communications A course in this area must meet the following learning outcomes. A student will: 1. Express oneself clearly in one or more forms of communication, such as written, oral, visual, or aesthetic. 2. Maintain self-awareness and critical distance. 3. Work collaboratively. 4. Listen, observe, and adapt messages in a variety of situations, cultural contexts, and target audiences in a diverse society. Assessment reports will be submitted every July 1 detailing the activities and results of the previous fall and spring semesters with two exceptions. The report submitted on July 1, 2015, will include the activities and results of the Spring 2015 semester. Two reports will be submitted on July 1, The first, End of Cycle report will summarize activities and results for the entire cycle (Spring 2015 through Fall 2019). The second report will include the activities and results of the Spring 2020 semester, the first semester of the next five-year cycle. Assessment Procedures Every semester, the faculty leader of general education assessment will contact all of the faculty teaching courses in the areas of the General Education curriculum being assessed that semester. Broad samples of student work will be requested for the purposes of direct assessment. These samples, once collected, will be anonymized with respect to the student, the faculty member, and the course number. Samples of student work will be scored using the appropriate rubrics by the faculty leader, members of the General Education Subcommittee of UCASC, and/or other interested faculty. Rubrics that have already been developed are presented in Appendix B. This plan will be amended as additional rubrics are developed consistent with the assessment schedule presented below. In addition to requesting student work performed during the current semester, the faculty leader will investigate the availability of student work from previous semesters. If, for example, the English Department has a large amount of student work from previous semesters of ENG 101, that work could be used for direct assessment in the Spring 2015 semester. The same principle applies to work collected this semester (and beyond); student work from Flexible Core courses collected this semester will be used for direct assessment in later semesters as it pertains to the Flexible Core. Preference is given to student work no more than two academic years old. 7 In general, samples of student work will be drawn to assess the learning outcomes identified in a given semester and to allow inferences to be made for various, relevant subsets of the population. Specifically, it will useful, as appropriate, to analyze: The full sample of work, to gain an overall picture of performance on a given learning outcome Work by course level, to measure the development of student skills and abilities as they progress through different levels of the curriculum Work from different parts of the general education curriculum, to measure the relative effectiveness of the Required Core, Flexible Core, and College Option in the development of these skills and abilities. Indirect assessment will be conducted using various survey instruments, such as the Student Evaluation of the Major and the National Survey of Student Engagement, complemented by instruments that are yet to be developed and other analyses as appropriate. Such analyses may include the following data: student responses to various surveys, course offerings, course grades, and other data available on CUNYFirst. Indirect assessment will address both the learning outcomes/areas of the curriculum being directly assessed that semester as well as the general education curriculum as a whole. Each annual report will describe in detail the instruments and analyses used for indirect assessment in that year and report those results. A Note on Assessing Skills Different sets of skills (e.g., writing skills) exist as learning outcomes in certain parts of the General Education curriculum. In addition to those parts where those skills are explicitly addressed, these skills comprise an important aspect of general education. The development of these skills, therefore, will be assessed across the curriculum and not only in the parts of the curriculum where they are listed. These skills include writing, critical thinking, information literacy, research, scientific inquiry, and communication and are referred to collective in the schedule that follows as Common Skills. In addition to the courses existing in the curricular areas explicitly listing these skills as goals, the development of these skills will be assessed using student work from all courses in the Flexible Core, all 300-level Justice Core courses, and 400-level capstone courses from a variety of programs. In this way, the College can examine the development and demonstration of these skills across the curriculum and at various levels. 8 General Education Assessment Schedule The General Education curriculum will be assessed using a five-year/ten-semester cycle. An end of cycle report will be written in the eleventh semester, coinciding with the first semester of the next five-year cycle. # Semester Learning Goals Assessed Other Activities/Notes 1 Spring 2015 Writing, critical thinking, information literacy, and research related goals For the first round of assessment, the Flex Core Required Core: A. English Comp. and College Option will Flexib
Recommended
View more...
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks